The Internet is a tool which allows us to interact across borders. Effective regulation on the Internet should be global or at least regional through common rules such as laws of the European Union. Human Rights are the basis of such rules because they focus on human dignity. They are universal and understandable across physical and disciplinary borders. They relate to all people, regardless of their culture, nationality, ethnicity, professional backgrounds, confessions, etc.

Human Rights can also help in guiding decisions in other areas. For example, how should we handle “hate speech” on the Internet? How do we deal with a “right to be forgotten”? How and in which conditions should we protect the privacy of people also in the online world?

Some of the most important texts in this regard are the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, Convention 108 of the Council of Europe (Convention for the Protection of Individuals with regard to Automatic Processing of Personal Data), the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights.[1]

Human Rights help in building bridges across global regions and ultimately result in remedies across borders and safeguards without borders.



[1] For more information on Convention 108 please visit https://www.coe.int/en/web/data-protection/modernisation-convention108 accessed 14.08.2017. For more information on the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights please visit http://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/index.html accessed 14.08.2017. For more information on United Nations International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights please visit http://www.ohchr.org/EN/ProfessionalInterest/Pages/CCPR.aspx accessed 14.08.2017.